Mixing traditional and Modern architecture

We had to share our clients spectacular renovation merging a traditional Tudor with modern architecture….you will be in awe too!

Check out the full article in the Wall Street Journal

THEN

NOW

This glass-and-steel rectangular box is a modern addition to a 1920s Tudor home in Rye, N.Y. owned by Chris and Dana Perriello. Designed by Architect Joeb Moore, founder of the Greenwich, Conn. architectural firm Joeb Moore & Partners and a professor of architecture at both Barnard/Columbia and Yale, it is clad in charcoal colored stained cedar and juts out from the rear, with slatted wood walls and floor-to-ceiling glass windows.
On the façade, the house, which has a 200-year-old Elm tree in front, looks like many others on its street in the wealthy suburb.
What had been a sitting room is now empty except for a big white Le Beanock hammock hanging from the ceiling over a shaggy gray rug. The family calls this the ‘unsitting room’.
Interior designer Diana Byrne of DB Design kept the colors neutral but the materials and textures varied to give the whole house a streamlined, contemporary look. Shown here is the living room in the front of the house.
The interior architecture throughout both the original rooms and the addition is contemporary, with little trim and sparse modern furnishings. Another shot of the living room and “unsitting” room.
Ms. Byrne chose wallpaper (like the kind shown here in the dining room) to keep the textures interesting without adding too much of an expense.
Ms. Byrne also used brightly colored high lacquer paint in some areas to give the feel of glass but for less money, as she did here in the bar in the dining room.
The Perriellos knocked down walls to expand the kitchen, which is open to the new addition, including the stairway, and has nano-crystalized glass counters called Glassos.
The kitchen, which had been small, with dark cabinets and stairs going down to the basement, is now open to the dining room.
The steel-and-glass stairway acts as a transition between the original home (the end of which is demarked by the original exterior stone wall, which is now enclosed inside) to the addition, which includes this family room.
The family room has sliding glass doors that open to the new deck. Their dog Sahsa, 12, sits on a cotton chenille sofa.
The new addition includes a master bedroom that cantilevers over the outside deck below.
The guest bedroom is in a space that the couple used as a kid’s bedroom before the renovation.
The master bathroom.
Ms. Periello is a stylist who does wardrobe consulting, so a closet (this is the master bedroom closet) that could keep belongings efficiently was important to her. The couple used a California Closets system instead of custom-made cabinets to save money.
Originally the architects had suggested the guest bedroom go on the third floor, but the Perriellos loved the space and wanted it for their daughter Olivia’s room.
Olivia, shown here with her brother Luke, says she has had as many as six friends at a time on the ‘bubble chair’ in her room.
The custom made bunk bed for their son Luke cost about $7,000. He has a rope that hangs from the ceiling for getting up and down.
The back deck of the house is made from ipe. The couple wanted to have a big enough yard for their kids to play.
This glass-and-steel rectangular box is a modern addition to a 1920s Tudor home in Rye, N.Y. owned by Chris and Dana Perriello. Designed by Architect Joeb Moore, founder of the Greenwich, Conn. architectural firm Joeb Moore & Partners and a professor of architecture at both Barnard/Columbia and Yale, it is clad in charcoal colored stained cedar and juts out from the rear, with slatted wood walls and floor-to-ceiling glass windows.

This glass-and-steel rectangular box is a modern addition to a 1920s Tudor home in Rye, N.Y.  Designed by Architect Joeb Moore, founder of the Greenwich, Conn. architectural firm Joeb Moore & Partners and a professor of architecture at both Barnard/Columbia and Yale.

 
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